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Black or Absent?
 
Degari  posted on Jan 11, 2011 8:33:08 PM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by Rise_Against

Link

Endgame.

[Edited by Rise_Against, 1/11/2011 12:25:09 PM]

Rather nice of them to put a picture of the colour black, isn't it?

 
yosup  posted on Jan 11, 2011 8:44:16 PM - Report post

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African American or absent.*

Also, I always learned that black was an indication of no color, and white was every color in one.

[Edited by yosup, 1/11/2011 8:46:13 PM]

 
Neo7  posted on Jan 11, 2011 8:48:28 PM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by saurabhfzd

quote:
originally posted by Neo7

Under light theory (The visible light you can see):
Light is the combination of all colors in even proportions
Black is the absence of all light (not considered a color)
--Main theory is that no combination of light will yield black.

Under molecular theory (Your painting supplies):
Light is the absence of all pigmentation (not considered a color)
Black is the combination of all pigmentation in even proportions.
--Main theory is that no combination of molecules will yield white.

so...what u're saying is...neither can be said to be a color...technically?

It depends on the source.

For example, my laptop's color is black but this is following the molecular theory as they used a specific paint for the plastic outer casing of my laptop.

But when dealing with the light spectrum, when you split white light, you get the entire visible color spectrum showing no traces of black to create. This is best illustrated by looking at a black hole in that all you see is black but there is nothing being reflected back to the person because a black hole absorbs everything beyond the event horizon (leaving a void in which nothing exists therefore black does not exist).

Pigmentation works by reflecting the color of the pigment back towards the person and your eyes see this color. Black simply absorbs everything but to do this, the actual molecular compound must be black and therefore black does exist as a color in the Periodical Elements.

It is important to note that the light spectrum is energy while pigmentation is matter. You cannot have something be energy and matter at the same time (you are either one or the other). Each have their own unique properties.

[Edited by Neo7, 1/11/2011 8:51:41 PM]

 
saurabhfzd  posted on Jan 11, 2011 10:05:35 PM - Report post

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yes...i get what u're saying. technically it does depend on the source. its relative rather than constant.
 
Shibby  posted on Jan 12, 2011 12:14:39 AM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by Nic_Durron

quote:
originally posted by saurabhfzd

black is as much a color as white. absence of color could be said for both..hence if white is considered a color then so is black.

No. White is different.

Within art, both are not colours.

However, within the light spectrum white technically IS a colour. White is a result of all the colours combining. Black is when there is no light. If I go any deeper explaining that I'll end up mind-ninja'd again over the fact that black is devoid of light and how colours really work and-and-and *brain short-circuits*

Who said light must be present to define a colour? I can't find anything about that

 
SuperSkyline89  posted on Jan 12, 2011 8:32:10 AM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by potato_chips

Who said light must be present to define a colour? I can't find anything about that

Colour is produced when a material absorbs certain (or all) colours present in white light. No light, no colour.

[Edited by SuperSkyline89, 1/12/2011 8:32:27 AM]

 
QueenNic  posted on Jan 12, 2011 10:16:08 AM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by potato_chips

quote:
originally posted by Nic_Durron

quote:
originally posted by saurabhfzd

black is as much a color as white. absence of color could be said for both..hence if white is considered a color then so is black.

No. White is different.

Within art, both are not colours.

However, within the light spectrum white technically IS a colour. White is a result of all the colours combining. Black is when there is no light. If I go any deeper explaining that I'll end up mind-ninja'd again over the fact that black is devoid of light and how colours really work and-and-and *brain short-circuits*

Who said light must be present to define a colour? I can't find anything about that

Well, consider this. If there is no light, everything is black. Even if you know the objects are a certain colour in the light, it doesn't change that absence of light makes them black.


Ergo, light is required for there to be colour.

 
Shibby  posted on Jan 12, 2011 2:08:57 PM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by Nic_Durron

quote:
originally posted by potato_chips

quote:
originally posted by Nic_Durron

quote:
originally posted by saurabhfzd

black is as much a color as white. absence of color could be said for both..hence if white is considered a color then so is black.

No. White is different.

Within art, both are not colours.

However, within the light spectrum white technically IS a colour. White is a result of all the colours combining. Black is when there is no light. If I go any deeper explaining that I'll end up mind-ninja'd again over the fact that black is devoid of light and how colours really work and-and-and *brain short-circuits*

Who said light must be present to define a colour? I can't find anything about that

Well, consider this. If there is no light, everything is black. Even if you know the objects are a certain colour in the light, it doesn't change that absence of light makes them black.


Ergo, light is required for there to be colour.

But when light is shining on everything and still some objects show as black, is this an absence of light? I don't think so.

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