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Pc issue
 
KeeperUsiel  posted on Jan 22, 2015 9:39:40 AM - Report post

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How about...no? There are many different and compelling reasons to overclock, only one of which is increased FPS. I would agree that back in the 440BX days (which you probably weren't around for) that you did run the risk of hardware damage if you set up your voltages incorrectly. However, today, yeah...not so much especially given that most manufacturers of high end boards expect that the consumer will overclock. Not only do they expect it, they now provide you with tools to do it automatically and safely.

I also disagree with the notion that it isn't great "in the long run". While the plural of anecdote is not data, this is my experience with the boards I have overclocked:

ABIT BH6 "Legion" board with a Celeron 300A OC'ed to 450Mhz circa 1998 that is still running! I saw that machine mid-last year and the older gentleman I had donated it to was still using it to host his website for his RC plane hobby. That's 17 years of service and still kicking. It's still on its original motherboard, proc, memory, power supply, chassis and 2X Creative optical drive.

Intel 850GB "Garibaldi" with a Pentium 4 OC'ed to 3Ghz(!) that I ran in a tank of mineral oil. It lasted for a little more than 5 years before I got tired of swapping out the oil and threw it away.

Intel 975XBX2 "Bad Axe" board with a Q6600 OC'ed to a conservative 3.5Ghz running a closed loop, AIO Corsair watercooling solution circa 2005. Ten years of service and still kicking, it's still in its original state with no replacement parts and serves as a 12TB NAS unit with NAS4Free.

Intel X58SO "Smackover" board with an I7-990X OC'ed to 5Ghz with a closed loop watercooling solution circa 2008. Also still kicking and serves as a 24TB NAS unit with NAS4Free.

Intel DZ68BC "The Problem Child" board with a Core I5 2500K OC'ed to 3.2Ghz on air cooling circa 2011. It currently spends its days as a CentOS 6.6 server running nginx, Transmssion, DNS, mail, OpenVPN and as a relay node. Funnily enough, I did have a problem with this machine that made it unstable as Hell but it turned out not to be an OC problem but, rather, a problem between Intel boards of the era and Corsair power supplies. Swapped out the PSU for an Antec and it has been rock solid ever since.

Intel BOXDZ77GAL-70K "The Heretic" board running a Core I7-3770K OC'ed to 4.5Ghz on air cooling circa 2012. This is a machine I have mounted in my rack at home and serves as my gaming machine currently. It's never been unstable for a moment and I expect it to last me well in to 2017 when it will be time for an upgrade. At that point, I expect to use it as another NAS unit and see it last for another 7-10 years.

Shuttle SZ87R6 "This is a 'work' box?!?!?!" running a Core I7 4770K with a mild 10% OC. It's my daily driver at my desk that I use to play games with, compile on and work on VMs. It's only a year old.

I've done many more systems than just these but these are the ones that I truly remember for one reason or another. They go as far back as 17 years, span 6 different eras of computing and are all still alive and well.

 
wee_wee  posted on Jan 22, 2015 3:55:22 PM - Report post

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have you tried this d/l iobit and run it its free so let it run and it will help out too fix problems
 
DABhand  posted on Jan 23, 2015 5:08:05 AM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by KeeperUsiel

How about...no? There are many different and compelling reasons to overclock, only one of which is increased FPS. I would agree that back in the 440BX days (which you probably weren't around for) that you did run the risk of hardware damage if you set up your voltages incorrectly. However, today, yeah...not so much especially given that most manufacturers of high end boards expect that the consumer will overclock. Not only do they expect it, they now provide you with tools to do it automatically and safely.

I also disagree with the notion that it isn't great "in the long run". While the plural of anecdote is not data, this is my experience with the boards I have overclocked:

ABIT BH6 "Legion" board with a Celeron 300A OC'ed to 450Mhz circa 1998 that is still running! I saw that machine mid-last year and the older gentleman I had donated it to was still using it to host his website for his RC plane hobby. That's 17 years of service and still kicking. It's still on its original motherboard, proc, memory, power supply, chassis and 2X Creative optical drive.

Intel 850GB "Garibaldi" with a Pentium 4 OC'ed to 3Ghz(!) that I ran in a tank of mineral oil. It lasted for a little more than 5 years before I got tired of swapping out the oil and threw it away.

Intel 975XBX2 "Bad Axe" board with a Q6600 OC'ed to a conservative 3.5Ghz running a closed loop, AIO Corsair watercooling solution circa 2005. Ten years of service and still kicking, it's still in its original state with no replacement parts and serves as a 12TB NAS unit with NAS4Free.

Intel X58SO "Smackover" board with an I7-990X OC'ed to 5Ghz with a closed loop watercooling solution circa 2008. Also still kicking and serves as a 24TB NAS unit with NAS4Free.

Intel DZ68BC "The Problem Child" board with a Core I5 2500K OC'ed to 3.2Ghz on air cooling circa 2011. It currently spends its days as a CentOS 6.6 server running nginx, Transmssion, DNS, mail, OpenVPN and as a relay node. Funnily enough, I did have a problem with this machine that made it unstable as Hell but it turned out not to be an OC problem but, rather, a problem between Intel boards of the era and Corsair power supplies. Swapped out the PSU for an Antec and it has been rock solid ever since.

Intel BOXDZ77GAL-70K "The Heretic" board running a Core I7-3770K OC'ed to 4.5Ghz on air cooling circa 2012. This is a machine I have mounted in my rack at home and serves as my gaming machine currently. It's never been unstable for a moment and I expect it to last me well in to 2017 when it will be time for an upgrade. At that point, I expect to use it as another NAS unit and see it last for another 7-10 years.

Shuttle SZ87R6 "This is a 'work' box?!?!?!" running a Core I7 4770K with a mild 10% OC. It's my daily driver at my desk that I use to play games with, compile on and work on VMs. It's only a year old.

I've done many more systems than just these but these are the ones that I truly remember for one reason or another. They go as far back as 17 years, span 6 different eras of computing and are all still alive and well.

Like I said it is only for enthusiasts.

And I think a tank full of mineral oil with a mobo in it classifies you as one

But for the ordinary user, overclocking isn't a good idea. And I will stick with it.

 
KeeperUsiel  posted on Jan 23, 2015 7:36:34 AM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by DABhand

quote:
originally posted by KeeperUsiel

How about...no? There are many different and compelling reasons to overclock, only one of which is increased FPS. I would agree that back in the 440BX days (which you probably weren't around for) that you did run the risk of hardware damage if you set up your voltages incorrectly. However, today, yeah...not so much especially given that most manufacturers of high end boards expect that the consumer will overclock. Not only do they expect it, they now provide you with tools to do it automatically and safely.

I also disagree with the notion that it isn't great "in the long run". While the plural of anecdote is not data, this is my experience with the boards I have overclocked:

ABIT BH6 "Legion" board with a Celeron 300A OC'ed to 450Mhz circa 1998 that is still running! I saw that machine mid-last year and the older gentleman I had donated it to was still using it to host his website for his RC plane hobby. That's 17 years of service and still kicking. It's still on its original motherboard, proc, memory, power supply, chassis and 2X Creative optical drive.

Intel 850GB "Garibaldi" with a Pentium 4 OC'ed to 3Ghz(!) that I ran in a tank of mineral oil. It lasted for a little more than 5 years before I got tired of swapping out the oil and threw it away.

Intel 975XBX2 "Bad Axe" board with a Q6600 OC'ed to a conservative 3.5Ghz running a closed loop, AIO Corsair watercooling solution circa 2005. Ten years of service and still kicking, it's still in its original state with no replacement parts and serves as a 12TB NAS unit with NAS4Free.

Intel X58SO "Smackover" board with an I7-990X OC'ed to 5Ghz with a closed loop watercooling solution circa 2008. Also still kicking and serves as a 24TB NAS unit with NAS4Free.

Intel DZ68BC "The Problem Child" board with a Core I5 2500K OC'ed to 3.2Ghz on air cooling circa 2011. It currently spends its days as a CentOS 6.6 server running nginx, Transmssion, DNS, mail, OpenVPN and as a relay node. Funnily enough, I did have a problem with this machine that made it unstable as Hell but it turned out not to be an OC problem but, rather, a problem between Intel boards of the era and Corsair power supplies. Swapped out the PSU for an Antec and it has been rock solid ever since.

Intel BOXDZ77GAL-70K "The Heretic" board running a Core I7-3770K OC'ed to 4.5Ghz on air cooling circa 2012. This is a machine I have mounted in my rack at home and serves as my gaming machine currently. It's never been unstable for a moment and I expect it to last me well in to 2017 when it will be time for an upgrade. At that point, I expect to use it as another NAS unit and see it last for another 7-10 years.

Shuttle SZ87R6 "This is a 'work' box?!?!?!" running a Core I7 4770K with a mild 10% OC. It's my daily driver at my desk that I use to play games with, compile on and work on VMs. It's only a year old.

I've done many more systems than just these but these are the ones that I truly remember for one reason or another. They go as far back as 17 years, span 6 different eras of computing and are all still alive and well.

Like I said it is only for enthusiasts.

And I think a tank full of mineral oil with a mobo in it classifies you as one

But for the ordinary user, overclocking isn't a good idea. And I will stick with it.

"And I think a tank full of mineral oil with a mobo in it classifies you as one"

I disagree, it was more along the lines of "Well, just how far can I take this?" I do that in pretty much every facet of my life so I'd have to be an "enthusiast" of a lot of different things. For example, am I a "dishwasher enthusiast" because I swapped out the drain hose and installed a higher volume drain pump on my dishwasher to drain it faster? Am I an "air conditioner enthusiast" because I swapped out the coils in my AC unit for coils that were more efficient and colder? Or would that make me an "efficiency enthusiast"?


"But for the ordinary user, overclocking isn't a good idea. And I will stick with it."

Again, what data do you have to support this? As I said previously, if you're buying a high end board...the tools are there, provided by the manufacturer. You can literally teach an 84 year old grandmother how to do it and the tools provided by the manufacturer are built around the idea that it must be easy for the most technically illiterate person to accomplish. "Press button, make go fast" mentality level. Further, a company isn't going to offer a product with manufacturer supported performance gains if that process hasn't been tested out the wazoo.

If I went through and charted the amount of system failures I've experienced caused by increasing performance beyond stock versus the amount of systems that did not fail, I know right off the top of my head that the data points would skew heavily toward the "did not fail" category.

You're making an absolute statement and I would like to see that data you have that supports that absolute statement.

 
element5  posted on Jan 23, 2015 12:13:29 PM - Report post

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"Overclocking: So Easy Even Your Grandma Can Do It!"

[url]www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GR5_X1CfUA' target='_blank'>Link

That said, while I am ok with situational overclocking, I've always thought if you need to OC a brand new system, then you didn't buy enough power to start with. If we gamers buy enough horsepower in a new PC, we shouldn't have to OC from the start.

My experience with my last 3-4 PC's has been much the same. I will buy the top of the line - or near the top - cpu. I personally find that somewhere between year 2 and year 4 you're gonna start to see new games starting to tax your system's raw horsepower. If you've bought a strong cpu to start with, you should be able to simply upgrade your video card once, maybe even twice, in that PC's lifetime.

I've always saved my OC'ing for the last 1/4 to a 1/3 of its usable lifetime. Buying a new video card and upticking the cpu a little at this time has gained me one year to almost 2 years of good service for gaming. You should be able to dismiss some of the lag and keep the FPS at a respectable level.

We used to hear that computing power doubled every 18 months. Then it was every 18 to 24 months. I'm retired now so I don't know what the current thinking is at present. Developers know this and have always taken advantage of this increase in power by adding more and more complexity to the graphics in video games.

But OC'ing and getting a new GPU has worked very well for me and it's almost always been in year 3 or 4. And that's a heckuva lot cheaper than a whole new system.

When I got this Falcon Northwest PC, they asked me if I wanted them to OC it. They said Intel would void the warranty if it's OC'd but that they would still warranty the cpu for the full 3 years if I OC'd it. I passed on that and will wait till lateron in its life to OC.

But it seems weird to me that they produce these chips unlocked (like the K series) and know dang well people will be OC'ing them but then they disallow the warranty. That's what makes very little sense to me.

Only thing I can think of is they're ok with peeps shortening the lifespan of their cpus because then they'll have to buy new ones.

At any rate, Good move Drenus, you made the right choice for your cpu. Now, at least, if down the road you want to OC your cpu, you have that option with the K series, plus it's a top notch cpu for your new rig to start with.

I did happen to notice on the build sheet link you posted, looks like they're OC'ing your GTX 970 video card? Just sayin.

 
Drenus  posted on Jan 23, 2015 12:30:19 PM - Report post

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@Element

hmm, where do you read that its factory OC?


and yea, i thought that since i was upgrading, i might as well go the full 9 yards, and get a proper system

i thought of 1 question tho, how many HDD power cables does the power supply come with?, i can't seem to properly google it, i ask because the rig comes with 1 HDD already plugged in, and then i got a SSD, and another older HDD i also wanna plug in, does the power supply have enought wires, or do i need to purchase extras?

it also hit me, how much power does 3 HDD's eat?, im worried that 550 isn't enought, combined with the req of the other components, im prob worried without cause, but if its gonna be an issue, i still have time now, to get the power supply changed

 
element5  posted on Jan 23, 2015 12:36:52 PM - Report post

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Unless I'm reading it wrong, where it says:

GRAFIKKORT: ASUS 4GB GTX970 STRIX (OVERCLOCKED DCII)

No?

I'd say between 850 to 1000 for a Power supply. Falcon put 1000 in my system.




[Edited by element5, 1/23/2015 12:40:13 PM]

 
Drenus  posted on Jan 23, 2015 12:39:43 PM - Report post

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quote:
originally posted by element5


Unless I'm reading it wrong, where it says:

GRAFIKKORT: ASUS 4GB GTX970 STRIX (OVERCLOCKED DCII)

No?

I'd say between 850 to 1000 for a Power supply. Falcon put 1000 in my system.

[Edited by element5, 1/23/2015 12:39:33 PM]

far as i can understand, DCII is the Fan, so wouldn't that just be the cooling that got alittle extra?

the above might be a completly ridiculess guess, but im so far behind on pc's nowadays, that i might as well be 100, dead and buried

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